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Delve deeper into the historical city of St Davids, the UK’s smallest city, with St Davids Walks.

Pete your guide will take you on a tour of the city to show its hidden depths, interesting corners and to tell you more about its history than you will be able to find in a guide book.

Our walks last for one hour, two hours or you can take a bespoke tour of your choice.

 

St Davids:

St Davids is the birthplace of David (Dewi in Welsh), the patron saint of Wales. He was born in the late 5th century, of royal parentage, his father Sandde being a Prince of Ceredigion and his mother Non a niece of King Arthur.

He grew up with a great religious conviction and founded monastic settlements and churches in Wales, Brittany & South West England (including Glastonbury Abbey). Reputedly he made a pilgrimage to Jerusalem and brought back a stone, which now sits in an altar in the Cathedral.

He was a teetotal vegetarian apparently and his diet consisted almost exclusively of leeks and water! Interestingly, he is the only native born British and Irish patron saint.

St Davids has the distinction of being the smallest city in Britain, both in terms of size and population, with around 1800 residents. City status was granted in the 16th century, lost in 1888 & restored in 1995. Its historic importance is emphasised by the fact that 200 of its buildings are listed.

Historically it was a place of pilgrimage and visitors came from far and wide to see the shrine of St David. In medieval times St Davids occupied a strategic position at the junction of major land, and particularly sea, routes between England, Wales & Ireland.

Nowadays, as well as visitors motivated by faith, St Davids attracts those who come here for the stunning coastal and inland scenery, myriad of outdoor activities available, tasty local produce and the warm Welsh welcome. The city is situated in Britain’s only coastal National Park and benefits from the protection of the natural environment that brings; many buildings and areas of land are also owned by the National Trust too so will remain pristine and unspoilt for many generations to come